The Best $3.00 You Will Ever Spend

Lax_ballNowadays, what can you get for $3? An RX Bar? A bag of Giants sunflower seeds? Three Powerball tickets? Not much outside of these, unless you are one who frequents the “golden arches”. Then I guess you could get a double quarter-pounder, a McChicken and a value French fries.

Well, there is one more thing that comes to mind that would be worth your $3.00: a lacrosse ball. Of the aforementioned items and almost anything else out there for the price, can you get more than one use out of any of them? Probably not.

The white lacrosse ball that I purchased early on in my CrossFit journey has seen more places on me than anyone except my wife. It may not be the pearly white ball that I once had, but it has lost no value in my mind.

Over the past couple of years, the lacrosse ball has become more widely known as a mobility tool than as what it is ordinarily intended for. Here are a few practical uses for one outside of the gym:

Mobilization for the desk-jockey:

  • In some cases you don’t even need to stand up to mobilize. Start with the ball just above the back of your knee, on your hamstring. Keep it there for five minutes, then slowly move it closer to your buttocks until you have it right on your glute. The people who know you do CrossFit already think that you’re weird, so prove them right and help yourself out while you’re trapped at work.

For the standing desk-jockey:

  • This one will take slightly more effort on your part, but at most about 2%. You will slide one shoe off and stand on the lacrosse ball. The amount of pressure you can put on it will increase as your foot starts to loosen up. Typically, I start on the ball of my foot, with my toes curled around the ball. Try to let it sink into your foot instead of just rolling it around. You will notice how when you relax, your muscles start to let their guard down and allow you to really make some progress. I have spent an hour on each foot on more than one occasion, but I’ve also done quick sessions when I don’t have a lot of extra time on my hands.

Airplane travel:

  • A wise man, you may know him as Matt Onken, once told me to bring my lacrosse ball on a plane and mobilize while you cannot do much else. So, recently I had a three and a half hour flight to California and I brought my lacrosse ball. It was the longest mobility session of my life, but I also felt like a new man walking off that plane, which I have never been able to say before. I did the hamstring/glute one from above but also my entire back. This one is really difficult: you need to find any spot on your back and just lean against it. I started on my upper back and worked it around different areas for about five minutes each. I watched two movies and fell asleep all while getting in some quality mobility work.

There are literally hundreds of uses for this little devil. Spend some time with your lacrosse ball in areas that you need it the most and I guarantee you’ll start to feel better. Any of our coaches would be more than happy to recommend some of our favorite tips and tricks for putting the lacrosse ball to work. Just ask if you’re in need of some recommendations.

What the Running Skill Series Taught Me

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Do you enjoy running, or do you hide from it? Is it a way for you to relax and calm yourself down, or the exact opposite? Are you part of the 80% of people who get injured when they run, or are you the happy minority?

If you’ve had negative experiences with running, what was it that caused you to dislike it so much? Does running make your workouts exponentially harder? Is it boring? Do you hurt yourself every time you try to run?

For me it was all of the above, especially the last one. For as long as I can remember, I have had shin splints when I’ve gone running. This dates all the way back to my high school football days, where the only time I wouldn’t feel them was when the adrenaline kicked in during a game. Even running the bases in softball was tough. It would almost make me want to not try for anything more than a single so I wouldn’t have to limp further than to first. To most recently when we would have a running workout in CrossFit and I was forever resigned to rowing.

I tried all kinds of running shoes, orthotics, shin compression sleeves, you name it I’ve tried it.

I remember about a year ago when I hurt my wrist and couldn’t do many of the gym’s workouts. I was sick of doing squats and sit-ups, so I decided to go for a run because I couldn’t stand sitting around anymore. I was going to run all the way around Lake of the Isles without stopping, or at least that was my hope. But just in case I needed to stop or my shin splints flared up, I had my wife follow me in the car blaring the Rocky 4 soundtrack as I ran in my all-gray sweatsuit. Just kidding… well only the rocky 4 part. Everything else actually happened.

To my surprise, I made it all the way around the lake without stopping once. The second farthest run I’ve ever run. Well, for the next week I could barely walk because my shin splints were so bad.

So needless to say I hated running!!

As a competitive guy it always bothered me that I couldn’t run and I’d have to scale to something that I knew my body could handle. Six weeks ago I decided to do something about it and forced myself to take on the uncomfortable task of  joining the TTF Running Skill Series.

This clinic is designed to teach you how to run with the proper mechanics, and mobility that is required. At this point I had tried everything else, so why not.

We started off with a heavy dose of mobility and how to treat any hot spots or places we tender after running.

Think of it this way. If you are deadlifting with a round back a coach sees you doing it, what is their response? Do they say “well that was terrible, now try one hundred more until you get better?” No! A good coach will correct any faulty mechanics immediately, and will point out any movement/mobility issues so you can work to improve them.

Why should running be any different? Because it’s a basic movement and we have been doing it our whole life?

Week by week, we increased our running and every week I had no shin splints. Fast forward to week six, back on Lake of the Isles for thirty minutes of straight running. Once again I made it all the way around without stopping, but this time no shin splints. The next two days I ran again, still no shin splints. I was amazed.

This course taught me something that anyone can learn. It taught me how to run without pain and how to supplement my activity with proper mobility tricks to keep me moving.

If you are someone that has pain every time you run, or if you were like me and avoid running at all costs for fear of injury, you should check out our next Running Skill Series on May 23rd.

Take control of your workouts instead of letting them dictate what you can do!

 

Sometimes You Just Need To Go

11807651_1039727836045412_2842831553556510238_oIf you are new here at TwinTown, or if you have been here for years, you know that we place a high value on moving well and moving correctly.

These are paramount to everything we do whether we are squatting, working on pull-ups or perfecting our Olympic lifts.

If you are moving well and executing movements within a safe range of motion, where is the next area to improve?

INTENSITY, BRO!!!

For a lot of us in the gym, we have accomplished good movement patterns and now it’s just time to go!

What does this mean?

I’m glad you asked. If you just came off the pull-up bar or finished up your ring rows and now it’s time to do a set of ten heavy deadlifts, there are many things going through your mind and many different voices trying to pull you in different directions.

Catch your breath. You need a sip of water?  You have been working out for three and a half minutes now, after all. Okay, I’m going to start right after I chalk up and make one little lap to the garage door and back.

I have had everyone of these go through my head and you know what? I still do. But you need to remind yourself what your intention is for the workout.

Maybe your intention is just to survive the workout. Okay, I get it. We do some difficult things in here and you still may be new to them. What if your intention is to increase your stamina or endurance? Sure you can do these by just showing up and doing the programming, but to really excel you need to move past the mental hurdles that stand in your way.

Rest feels good to everyone, but you know what feels better? Improvement!

Personally speaking, I have been experimenting with this approach of eliminating or reducing rest periods in workouts for the past few months. It has gone super well and I feel that it has brought me to a different level than I was at before. Yes, this different level I’m talking about does mean quicker times along with the physical benefits, but what I value most is the power to crush those mental hurdles. I feel like I have taken control of my workouts.

*** Again, very important, this is not an approach that everyone should take just because you are reading this, but one that you should experiment with if you are moving without impingement and with great form.***

I want you to try something crazy now, the next time you feel winded and you want to take a rest, don’t!

What?!      But I…        I need to…       Ugh…

I know. The next time you feel (keyword) like you need to take a rest, don’t. Just go right into the next movement without stopping. I mean what is the worst that can happen? You will eventually take that rest you were going to anyways. But guess what, you have delayed that rest. What if you do it again the very next set? And again? And this keeps happening until you are done with the workout.

Then you come in the next day and do the same thing. And on and on. What have you done? You have increased your cardio capacity, you have increased the intensity and your stamina and endurance are now better than before.

People who excel don’t always have something that others don’t. Well come to think of it, yes they do. They want it more. What is “it” for you?

Remember that form is king, and that increasing your range of motion is vital to your longevity as an athlete, but if you can check these two boxes then the next box that needs to be checked is intensity.

And sometimes you just need to go!!

Start Preparing for “Murph” 2016

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Each Memorial Day, we take on “Murph.”

For time:
Run 1 mile
100 pull-ups
200 push-ups
300 squats
Run 1 mile

Seems straightforward, right? Well, there are multiple ways to slay this dragon. You are allowed to break up the 100 pull-ups, 200 pushups and 300 squats however you wish. Usually, people use the strategy of five pull-ups, ten pushups and fifteen squats at a time, to break the workout down into more manageable sets. I’m not saying this is what you have to do, but I wouldn’t recommend doing all of the reps for each movement at once.

This workout is a beast, and we will release all sorts of information about the event as we get closer, but for now we have a few plans of attack to help you prepare for “Murph.” For the running and squatting portions of the workout, just show up to class regularly. As we get closer to Memorial Day, we will ramp up running and squatting in our programming.

We have devised a plan for the pull-ups and pushups to have you peaking when “Murph” comes along eight weeks from now. Follow this link, “Murph” Prep, where we have broken down to the day how many pull-ups and pushups you should do to get yourself ready for May 30.

Before you get started on your weekly regimen, you will see a few “Initial Tests” on the spreadsheet. For pull-ups, if you are using any kind of resistance bands right now, do a set of five at the lowest level of resistance possible and write it down to see how much you improve over the next eight weeks. If you are doing bodyweight pull-ups, then do one max set of strict bodyweight pull-ups and write down your number so you can compare later.

For pushups, you will do something similar. If you are using ab mats for your pushups, start off by doing a set of ten in a row with the least amount of ab mats possible. Record the amount of ab mats you used. If you are not using ab mats, then do a max set of pushups and record your number.

For the weekly programming, most of you will do your pull-ups at the gym, unless you have access to a pull-up bar away from TwinTown. So, follow the “Murph” prep program everyday that you come to the gym. Each Monday, start at Day 1 on the spreadsheet. The next day that same week you come to the gym, do the required sets for Day 2. And so on.

Most of you may only get through Day 3 of the pull-up programming each week. This is fine. For those of you that come more than three times per week, you will get some additional work. All of you could come to open gym at 11:00am on Sundays to get another day of work in each week!

You can do the pushup programming everyday on your own at your home or office. Begin each week on Monday Day 1 of the programming, and end each week on Sunday Day 7 of the programming.

To summarize: do your pull-ups at the gym on days you come in. Do your pushups everyday on your own.

The point is, this is volume work. The more reps you do, the better. But every day you commit to working on your pull-ups and pushups will help you on May 30.

We will have spreadsheets posted around the gym for you to reference, or you could also print them off to keep with you. We will post weekly reminders on the whiteboard at the gym of which week of the programming we are currently on throughout the next eight weeks. If you have any questions, please ask one of us when you see us.

This is your year to crush “Murph!” Let’s prepare to take down this monster together.

How Little Things Make Big Differences

1795897_1106266209391574_673943306945917366_o“When you improve a little each day, eventually big things occur. When you improve conditioning a little each day, eventually you have a big improvement in conditioning. Not tomorrow, not the next day, but eventually a big gain is made. Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek small improvements one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens–and when it happens, it lasts.”- John Wooden

How can you apply this to your workouts?

Elite athletes excel at the little things. They don’t cheat efficiency. They put in the time needed on the basics and only then do they start to ramp up the intensity.

This is the only way you can have something last. You might be able to get away with bad form and still do really well, but it’s only a matter of time before it catches up to you.

If only we could all remember this when the clock starts each workout instead of throwing caution to the wind and just going as hard as possible.

Why not start today? Start with the basics. Do the little things right. If you can’t do the little things right, right away, then that is your starting point. Once you get that down, then you can ramp up the intensity, not the other way around.

How can you apply this to your mobility?

For those of you that were with us back in September, do you remember the Squatember Challenge? How comfortable were you in the bottom of your squat for ten minutes a day?

Personally speaking, it wasn’t very easy the first week. The second week was better, the third week was even better and the last week was awesome.

We did exactly what this quote says and little by little things got better, not at day two or three, but over time. Which means if you want something badly enough you will have to work for it.

Let’s say that you currently are experiencing shoulder pain. Each workout you are faced with two options: 1) you can gut it out and push through the discomfort hoping that it doesn’t getting any worse; 2) you can come into the gym early or stay late working on shoulder mobility and ask for a modification until your shoulder mobility improves or pain subsides.

This seems like an easy decision, but when you are faced with that cool looking workout that has overhead squats in it and you really want to do it, what are you going to do?

How can you apply this to your nutrition?

You don’t have to completely overhaul your diet to notice results. Well, for some of you, this probably is not a true statement, but for those of you who eat well during the week and go crazy on the weekends, there seems to be a glaring way to improve.

Instead of eating and drinking whatever you want on Friday and Saturday, and making that easy call to the local pizza shop for lunch on Sunday, try cutting this down to one day per week instead of the two and a half to three days of terrible eating.

You don’t have to be a complete saint, you can have fun too, but how fun is it when year after year nothing changes and you always feel the same way?

Once you make a little change, continue to do so in other more manageable ways each month, and at the end of the year, look at how far you have come.

How can you apply this to your life away from the gym?

Maybe a way to improve your lifestyle outside of the gym means having a better work-life balance. Instead of grinding through each day because you can, take a hour or two break to do something you enjoy or maybe that your significant other enjoys. Watch how you reduce your stress by doing this everyday over a period of time.

Maybe its shutting down the TV, computer and cell phone two hours before bed, and spending time with people or getting cozy to read a book. I was amazed at how much of an effect this had on me and that the results were almost immediate.

Maybe it’s just going to bed an hour earlier than you are now, or in the case of this quote, going to bed fifteen minutes earlier each week going so at the end of the month you have eased your way into going to bed one hour earlier. Watch how energized you will feel and how ready you are to get out and tackle the day.

There are many different areas in our day-to-day lives that this quote can help us slow down and do it the right way. How else can you make a change in your life by taking this simple advice?

Patience and Consistency

12356774_1100109356673926_228953655148068323_oThis past month I read an article in Success Magazine on James Lawrence, the guy who completed fifty Ironman races in fifty days, in fifty states.

An Ironman race consists of a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride and a 26.2 mile marathon. To finish one would be an extreme accomplishment, but fifty in fifty days all across America seems impossible.

On the fifth race in, he injured his shoulder which forced him to swim with one arm over the next several swims (which reminds me of Cat rowing with one arm for our 10K benchmark workout a few weeks ago).

On the eighteenth race exhaustion caught up to him and he fell asleep on his bike, but only suffered minor road rash in the crash. Other injuries he suffered throughout included a few toenails falling off, a hiatal hernia, and pushing his body so hard that his heart had to focus on pumping blood to his major organs causing him to lose feeling in his extremities.

How many of these would have caused you to quit? Would these cause you to give up on your goal?

What really hit home with me was what he said he thought about during the races. Sometimes he would have long conversations with himself, but most of the time, it was about focusing on what he would do in the next minute. Lawrence says he tried not to think about how many miles or days he had left; he just wanted to be perfect at whatever he was doing- running, biking or swimming- for the next minute.

Talk about a time where you would think absolute perfection would be the farthest thing from your mind, during this daunting task, but this is what allowed him to stay focused.

In relative terms, how hard would it be for us to focus on making every rep perfect in the movements we do, instead of just doing whatever is needed to finish as fast as possible?

When asked how he did this Lawrence said, “patience and consistency.” He went on to say, “you have to do a lot of things right over an extended period of time. You have to focus on the basics, and you have to be perfect at them. That’s ultimately why I succeeded: I was perfect with the basics, and I had patience. I became an expert at a lot of things, and that’s how I became successful- that’s one of the keys to success if anybody wants to tackle something of this enormity.”

This going back to the basics, really made sense with my goal that I’m working on for 2016. I want to preface what I’m about to say with the recognition that the only way my experiences should even be in the same blog post as something as amazing as what James Lawrence did, was that all I have focused on for the first month and a half of my goal is patience and consistency and just keeping it basic.

My goal is to accumulate 10,000 pull-ups and 10,000 pushups throughout the year. As of this writing I’m a little over 1,000 of each- so about on the pace I will need to keep going through the rest of the year.

I know I set this as my goal because all of my weaknesses in the gym stem from weak upper body strength, but I did not expect to see such amazing progress in such a short amount of time.

Through the first month I can now do bar muscle-ups consistently. Also, I have been doing ring muscle-ups for years, but they have always been an extreme struggle for me, and now I can string multiple reps together regularly. Until the past few weeks, I was only able to do them with a false grip, but now I’m able to do them without a false grip every time. This makes it easier to string together big sets of muscle-ups.

My working regimen for pull-ups are mostly sets of five strict pull-ups at a time and I’ll just do this for about 30-40 reps daily for the most part. There have been days where I have done zero and also days where I have done many more, but for the most part it has been pretty consistent. Pushups are easy for any of us to practice, because you can do them anywhere at anytime.

I’m excited to see the progress that takes place throughout the remainder of the year.

What can you do on a consistent basis to get better at something that has eluded you up to this point?

What Are We Trying To Do Here?

11878919_1050844324933763_6988515572939100698_oWhich one of these examples best fits the direction you want to go in the gym?

Example A:

- New PR’s/Faster Times

- Getting Stronger/Going Faster/Working Harder

- Becoming a “Better Mover”

Example B:

- Becoming a “Better Mover”

- Getting Stronger/Going Faster/Working Harder

- New PR’s/Faster Times

One is sexier than the other and, for the world of instant gratification we live in, is much more attractive. One is a little more vanilla and, for a lot of us, takes some time before we even notice a difference.

I’m sure you see where this is going, but guess which example we support?

One of these paths leads to longevity and the other leads to destruction. We choose to play the long game and we hope you do as well.

Along with making your safety at the gym paramount, we strive to make everyone who comes through our doors better movers.

We believe in quality over quantity. We would rather have you finish a workout last, if it means you execute the movements with perfect form, than finish first with bad form.

Just because your body has been able to “take it” up to this point doesn’t mean that will always be the case.

Look at the approach you take in other areas of your life: doctor/dentist appointments, changing the oil in your car, taking out a life insurance policy.

You can justify why taking precautionary measures in these area’s is the smart thing to do. Then why do you decide to take a different approach when it comes to your fitness?

The beautiful thing about mobility is that you can start anytime and you can do it anywhere. For many mobility exercises you don’t even need any equipment other than what God gave you.

“Okay, I want to improve my mobility but I don’t know the next steps to take?”

You don’t need to be a doctor to know what areas of your body don’t move the best. If you can’t touch your toes, start with some hamstring work. If you can’t support an empty bar overhead, work on your shoulder mobility. If you can’t keep your chest vertical throughout a squat, maybe you should work on making your hips more mobile.

Of course if you have had any type of injury in the past, or are dealing with one now, the first place to look is to professional advice from a doctor, physical therapist or chiropractor.

As coaches, we try to give you some of the more common mobilization techniques, hitting the areas where most of us need more range of motion. In  doing these, you might not always “feel the burn,” which you then might interpret as, “I’m not working.” Feeling like you’re not working doesn’t mean that the exercise is not working. It may just mean that you are mobile in that specific area of your body, so your joints and muscles aren’t under a lot of tension. Don’t get pissed because you can’t feel anything, rather, look for ways to keep your mobility in that area what it currently is or improve your mobility in that area by looking for a different variation of the movement.

We often talk about how well children move. For example, watch any child under the age of five squat. It is immaculate. But over the years the “use it or lose it” approach definitely applies to the way we move.

This does not mean that you are destined to remain how you are right now, forever. You can reclaim your mobility, but it might take more dedication and time than it did ten years ago.

We can only push you guys to work on mobility so much, the desire to improve must come from you, too. We have many areas we can help you in your endeavor to become a better mover, but you need to want it.

Kale and Potato Soup

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Here is a healthy, easy meal that I made last week when it was deathly cold outside. It gave me something to look forward to on my walks home from the gym. No matter your cooking ability, this one is pretty hard to mess up and it makes a nice amount of food that you can easily reheat.

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp olive oil

2 bunches of kale (tough stems removed)

1 onion finely chopped

1 lb. sausage (Eat Well- get ground pork and add sausage seasonings that you prefer- there are many different ways to do this depending on how spicy you like your food, Google it)

8 cups chicken broth

1 large white sweet potato

Salt and pepper

Instructions:

Brown sausage meat in olive oil. Add onion and cook until onions are soft. Add potatoes and stir for a few minutes. Add chicken stock and simmer until potatoes are soft (about 20 minutes). Add kale and cook for a few minutes (until kale is wilted and bright green, but not soggy). Season to taste with salt and pepper if needed.

The Man Who “Thought” His Way Into Partnership

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How many of you have read, “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill (pictured above)? This is one of, if not the top business book of all time.

The inspiration that this book gives anyone who reads it is truly endless.

You know how your grandpa, or even your dad, might tell you, “they just don’t make things like they used to,” or a some other similar phrase…well, I truly believe that books just aren’t written like this anymore.

This book is timeless! It was originally published in 1937 and the theme of the book itself is remarkable. And it is still just as true and impactful in 2016 as it was almost eighty years ago.

If you have not read it yet, do so.

Personally speaking, I have read this five times and it gets better each time.

I want to outline the story that begins this book in Chapter 1. Don’t go any further until you have read the first two pages about Edwin C. Barnes.

How powerful was that? The next story- 3 feet from gold is good too if you want to be more inspired than you already are…

What courage does it take to have such a burning desire to work with, not for, but with Thomas Edison, who is one of the greatest inventors and minds in United States history. You don’t even know Thomas Edison, nor do you have the money to pay for the train ride there, but your only desire is to work along side him so you take a step in faith and do it anyways.

Thomas Edison was no fool. He saw the passion in Edwin Barnes eyes and knew he had something special inside of him. He set Barnes on a path that if he worked hard enough, and truly did have the desire to work with him, he would be able to prove his worth over time.

Barnes started off on an even playing field with everyone else. He was not given any extra opportunities, but he truly was dedicated to achieving his goal, no matter how long it took.

When no one else thought that they could do it, Barnes knew he could. He didn’t just do the bare minimum to squeak by, he knocked it out of the park.

Thats how you go from being an “ordinary tramp” to being a business partner of the “Man of the Millennium“.

I’m no mathematician, but I believe a millennium equals 1000 years.

Thomas Edison was the ”person who brought more value to the human race than any other.”

Edwin C. Barnes must have done something pretty impressive to catch his eye.

What is your burning desire?

What do you want to accomplish more than anything in the world? What would you give up to get there?

Do you really have that desire or does it just sound good?  The work that is needed to achieve your burning desire is usually more than what people are willing to do.

What is your desire in terms of your overall health? Are you making any progress towards getting there or are you scared to start?

Besides writing it down and telling someone else what it is, what first step can you take towards that desire?

Shepherd’s Pie

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Eat Well is in full force and here is a recipe from Sunday nights potluck.

Funny story is that I forgot to take a picture of the first batch that I brought to the potluck, so this lovely piece of deliciousness pictured is from round two. And let me tell you it was as good as the first, for those of you that were at the potluck a few days ago.

The original recipe is from my favorite paleo cookbook, Well Fed. I have cooked this many times, but have made my own additions to this recipe.

The author, Melissa Joulwan has another book out that I do not own yet, Well Fed 2, and I’m sure it has equally tasty recipes in it.

Here are the instructions on cooking this dish for those of you that are interested:

Ingredients

1 batch cauliflower rice- (riced in a food processor)
1.5 TBSP- coconut oil
1 medium onion- diced (about 1 cup)
2 carrots- peeled and finely diced (about 1 cup)
2 cloves garlic, minced (about 2 tsp)
2 lb. ground lamb (I used ground beef instead)
salt and pepper to taste
1 TBSP tomato paste
1 cup beef or chicken broth
1 tsp coconut aminos
1 tsp dried rosemary
.5 tsp dried thyme leaves
3 egg whites
paprika

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Over medium heat, add the coconut oil for 3 minutes. Once it is heated add the onion and carrot and reduce heat to medium-low and cover; allow the veggies to get soft but not brown, about 5 minutes.

Add garlic to the pan until fragrant, about 1 minute.

With your hands crumble in the ground lamb/beef and break up big chunks with a wooden spoon.

Sauté until the meat is browned, 5-10 minutes. Taste and season with pepper.

Add tomato paste, broth, coconut aminos, rosemary and thyme to the pan.

Stir to combine and bring to a boil. Then let mixture simmer uncovered for another 10 minutes.

Set the pan aside and let cool for 10-15 minutes.

Scramble the egg whites until frothy and blend into the meat mixture.

Add 1 TBSP of coconut oil to another small pot and heat on medium. Once oil is heated add the riced cauliflower along with 1/8 cup water.

Cook, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes then take off heat.

Now it’s time to combine everything. In a 12×6 baking dish, first put in the meat mixture and smooth it out evenly. Next, add the cauliflower rice to the top and also spread out evenly. Lightly sprinkle the top with paprika.

Place on the middle rack of the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until the top begins to brown.

Remove and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes before eating.