Become A Double-Under Wizard

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I’m not going to mince words here, if you truly care about getting double unders consistently and you stress when you see them in a WOD, it’s your own fault. You haven’t worked hard enough to master double unders.

Just like I can’t do pistols because I never practice them and haven’t put in the necessary work to attain my goal, you can’t do double-unders because you don’t practice them outside the context of a class. It is ludicrous to think that practicing for ten minutes before a WOD, or going to one double-under clinic without practicing afterwards, will enable you to string them together consistently during a workout.

The good news is this is fixable.

It comes down to practice, practice, and more practice. I promise you that if you put in the time you will eventually become a wizard on the rope. Coach Joe wasn’t born with a rope in his hands. Ask him how he got so good.

Also, get your own rope. If you’re serious about mastering double unders, and you don’t own your own rope, and think that the beat up ropes we have at the gym are good enough, you are mistaken. This is the golf equivalent to using a set of rental clubs every time you hit your local course expecting to break par. Unless your name is Tiger Woods it’s probably not going to happen.

Here are some tips you can take with you to your practice sessions…after you buy your own rope.

Common faults and fixes

Fault: Hands drift apart causes rope to shorten and trip you up.

Fix: Keep your elbows close to your body; hands in front of your torso. You should be able to see your hands in your periphery.

Fault: Using your whole arm to move the rope. This is taxing and inefficient.

Fix: Move the rope with a quick flick of the wrists, or just your fingers.

Fault: Jumping like a donkey or piking throws rhythm out of whack and not efficient – power singles/maintain hollow position.

Fix: Practice a good up and down, rhythmic bounce. Practice single under power jumps to develop the proper technique and timing. Also, jump when rope is about to hit the ground and pass under your feet.

Fault: Loose core.

Fix: Maintain a hollow body position while jumping (imagine someone is going to punch you in the gut and hollow out to take the punch).