What Are We Trying To Do Here?

11878919_1050844324933763_6988515572939100698_oWhich one of these examples best fits the direction you want to go in the gym?

Example A:

- New PR’s/Faster Times

- Getting Stronger/Going Faster/Working Harder

- Becoming a “Better Mover”

Example B:

- Becoming a “Better Mover”

- Getting Stronger/Going Faster/Working Harder

- New PR’s/Faster Times

One is sexier than the other and, for the world of instant gratification we live in, is much more attractive. One is a little more vanilla and, for a lot of us, takes some time before we even notice a difference.

I’m sure you see where this is going, but guess which example we support?

One of these paths leads to longevity and the other leads to destruction. We choose to play the long game and we hope you do as well.

Along with making your safety at the gym paramount, we strive to make everyone who comes through our doors better movers.

We believe in quality over quantity. We would rather have you finish a workout last, if it means you execute the movements with perfect form, than finish first with bad form.

Just because your body has been able to “take it” up to this point doesn’t mean that will always be the case.

Look at the approach you take in other areas of your life: doctor/dentist appointments, changing the oil in your car, taking out a life insurance policy.

You can justify why taking precautionary measures in these area’s is the smart thing to do. Then why do you decide to take a different approach when it comes to your fitness?

The beautiful thing about mobility is that you can start anytime and you can do it anywhere. For many mobility exercises you don’t even need any equipment other than what God gave you.

“Okay, I want to improve my mobility but I don’t know the next steps to take?”

You don’t need to be a doctor to know what areas of your body don’t move the best. If you can’t touch your toes, start with some hamstring work. If you can’t support an empty bar overhead, work on your shoulder mobility. If you can’t keep your chest vertical throughout a squat, maybe you should work on making your hips more mobile.

Of course if you have had any type of injury in the past, or are dealing with one now, the first place to look is to professional advice from a doctor, physical therapist or chiropractor.

As coaches, we try to give you some of the more common mobilization techniques, hitting the areas where most of us need more range of motion. In  doing these, you might not always “feel the burn,” which you then might interpret as, “I’m not working.” Feeling like you’re not working doesn’t mean that the exercise is not working. It may just mean that you are mobile in that specific area of your body, so your joints and muscles aren’t under a lot of tension. Don’t get pissed because you can’t feel anything, rather, look for ways to keep your mobility in that area what it currently is or improve your mobility in that area by looking for a different variation of the movement.

We often talk about how well children move. For example, watch any child under the age of five squat. It is immaculate. But over the years the “use it or lose it” approach definitely applies to the way we move.

This does not mean that you are destined to remain how you are right now, forever. You can reclaim your mobility, but it might take more dedication and time than it did ten years ago.

We can only push you guys to work on mobility so much, the desire to improve must come from you, too. We have many areas we can help you in your endeavor to become a better mover, but you need to want it.